Thursday, April 17, 2014

Answering the "Long Roll" Call to Arms

Sunday, April 17, 1864

On Tuesday at 11:00 P.M. the Thirteenth New Hampshire responded to the "Long Roll," a call to arms or to battle, by marching from Camp Gilmore to Suffolk and lying on their arms all night. On Wednesday the Thirteenth deployed pickets at Suffolk and on Thursday marched along the Nansemond River to their old camp of May 1863 at Jericho Creek. Early Friday morning the Thirteenth boarded railroad cars for the return to Camp Gilmore. The event was designated a reconnaissance for cavalry with support of the infantry. Today the true reason for the reconnaissance was revealed, as the Thirteenth received orders to march in the morning with three-days rations for the beginning of the Spring Campaign of 1864. 1

References:
1S. Millett Thompson, Thirteenth Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865 : A Diary Covering Three Years and a Day (Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 247-49.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Detachment for Duty around Camp Gilmore

Sunday, April 10, 1864

The Thirteenth New Hampshire endured another week of heavy rain at Camp Gilmore. Many of the Thirteenth had again detached for picket, guard, garrison, and provost duty in and around camp. Today the Thirteenth took part in the usual Sunday regimen of inspection, dress parade, and religious services. 1

References:
1S. Millett Thompson, Thirteenth Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865 : A Diary Covering Three Years and a Day (Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 246.

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Colonel Stevens Returns for Service

Sunday, April 3, 1864

In the early part of the week heavy rain caused flooding at Camp Gilmore, with the wet weather postponing daily drills. At least one-hundred men from the Thirteenth New Hampshire were detached and sent to Portsmouth on provost guard duty. Colonel Aaron Stevens returned to Camp Gilmore on Friday, as he had been away from camp since December enlisting men for other New Hampshire regiments. General Ulysses S. Grant arrived in Norfolk by boat but did not make landing. This morning the Thirteenth lined up for inspection and in the evening engaged in a dress parade.1

References:
1S. Millett Thompson, Thirteenth Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865 : A Diary Covering Three Years and a Day (Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 244-46.

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Heavy Snow at Camp Gilmore

Sunday, March 27, 1864

A severe snowstorm on Monday left eight inches of snow at Camp Gilmore. The men of the Thirteenth New Hampshire Regiment endured a cold week in camp drilling in the snow and mud. Today the men of the Thirteenth New Hampshire engaged in the routine Sunday duties of inspection, dress parade, and religious services despite the snow and mud. 1

References:
1S. Millett Thompson, Thirteenth Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865 : A Diary Covering Three Years and a Day (Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 242-44.

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Voting Party Returns to Camp Gilmore

Sunday, March 20, 1864

The men of the Thirteenth New Hampshire Regiment enjoyed a week of pleasant weather at Camp Gilmore. On Saturday the voting party returned to camp and the Thirteenth was once again at full strength. Today the men of the Thirteenth New Hampshire devoted their energy to the usual Sunday regimen of inspection, dress parade, and religious services. 1

References:
1S. Millett Thompson, Thirteenth Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865 : A Diary Covering Three Years and a Day (Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 241-42.

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Skirmishes at Suffolk

Sunday, March 13, 1864

The men of the Thirteenth New Hampshire were rushed to Bowers Hill on Wednesday in response to skirmishes along the front near Suffolk, where nearly twenty cavalrymen were killed. The skirmishes were diversions to cover the Confederate retreat from Suffolk. After three days at Bowers Hill the Thirteenth New Hampshire returned to Camp Gilmore.1

References:
1S. Millett Thompson, Thirteenth Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865 : A Diary Covering Three Years and a Day (Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 239-41.

Thursday, March 6, 2014

Voting and Skirmishes

Sunday, March 6, 1864

News of a skirmish near Suffolk resulted in the Thirteenth New Hampshire under orders to move at a moment's notice. Many officers and men of the Thirteenth are granted leave to return to New Hampshire from Friday, March 4 to Wednesday, March 16 to vote in elections, reducing the strength of the Thirteenth to nearly 200 men. On Friday the voting party left Camp Gilmore by railroad to Portsmouth and then embarked on the steamboat "Guide." At the same time troops landed at Norfolk and Portsmouth and were rushed to Suffolk to meet any impending threats. Today the Thirteenth New Hampshire passed their time in camp, with the usual Sunday activities of inspection, dress parade, and religious services suspended. 1

References:
1S. Millett Thompson, Thirteenth Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865 : A Diary Covering Three Years and a Day (Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1888), 236-39.